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Concurrent Treatment for Substance Use Disorder and Trauma-Related Comorbidities: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Published on: August 16, 2017
Project Number: RC0911-000
Product Line: Rapid Response
Research Type: Devices and Systems
Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal
Result type: Report

Question

  1. What is clinical effectiveness of concurrent treatment for patients with substance use disorders and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, or depression?
  2. What is the clinical effectiveness of the treatment of one condition for the improvement of all symptoms in patients with substance use disorder and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, or depression?
  3. What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the treatment of patients with substance use disorders and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, or depression?

Key Message

There is a suggestion that integrated treatments offered greater improvement with respect to PTSD symptoms, depression or anxiety compared to no treatment or minimal treatment for patients with comorbid substance use disorder (SUD) and posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD), depression or anxiety disorder. However results were not always consistent.In patients with comorbid SUD and PTSD, there is a suggestion that addiction based interventions were more effective with respect to controlling substance use than control treatments.One evidence-based guideline recommended an integrated treatment approach for patients with comorbid alcohol use disorder and PTSD, or comorbid alcohol use disorder and anxiety disorder, and cognitive behavioral therapy for comorbid alcohol use disorder and depression.

Tags

anxiety disorders, depression, mental health, alcohol drinking, comorbidity, depressive disorder, diagnosis, dual (psychiatry), stress disorders, post-traumatic, substance-related disorders, therapeutics, treatment outcome, addiction, other miscellaneous topics, drug abuse, substance abuse, Addiction, addictions, PTSD, comorbid, co-morbid, dual diagnoses, dual diagnosis